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Linguine with Herb Broth and Clams Recipe

Linguine with Herb Broth and Clams Recipe



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Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
  • 6 garlic cloves, peeled, smashed
  • 2 medium tomatoes, cored, chopped
  • 3 pounds Manila clams or small littleneck clams, scrubbed
  • 1/3 cup thinly sliced fresh basil leaves
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh oregano
  • 2 pinches of dried crushed red pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Melt butter with olive oil in heavy large pot over medium heat. Add onions and cook until soft, stirring often, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and stir 1 minute. Add tomatoes and cook until beginning to soften, stirring often, about 2 minutes. Add white wine and 1 cup water and bring to boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer 20 minutes to blend flavors. DO AHEAD Broth can be made 1 day ahead. Cool slightly, then cover and refrigerate.

  • Bring broth to boil. Add clams, cover, and cook until clams open, 3 to 5 minutes (discard any clams that do not open). Transfer clams to large bowl; tent with foil to keep warm.

  • Stir basil, parsley, oregano, and crushed red pepper into broth in pot. Add linguine. Boil until pasta is almost tender but still very firm to bite, stirring often and adding water by tablespoonfuls if too dry. Return clams with any accumulated juices to pot. Cover and simmer until clams are heated through and pasta is tender but still firm to bite, about 3 minutes longer. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

  • Transfer linguine and clam mixture to large shallow platter and serve.

,Photos by Mitchell FeinbergReviews Section

Clams in Wine, Garlic and Herb Broth

Over the last decade (or two), I seem to have developed quite an aversion to crowds of people. The feeling of being hemmed in, the annoyance of trying to get where I’m going while people stand obliviously in the center of the walkway, frustration with children running over you while their self-adsorbed parents text and check their email…the list goes on. Life is hectic out there and I don’t often have the patience for it. (Yes, I’m old – and get off my lawn.) However, for something really worth the risk of leaving my controlled surroundings, like a Willie Nelson concert or traveling to an exciting destination, I will steel myself against the onslaught of humanity and march with the crowd.

Patty at Chowstalker.com recently wrote about visiting the Dekalb Farmer’s Market she drove for an hour to get there to stock up from the incredible produce and unbelievable meat selections. This reminded, or maybe shamed me, into remembering that I live not 10 minutes from this great, international farmer’s market. Why haven’t I been shopping there? Primarily because it is IMMENSE and full of people. By immense, I mean 140,000 square feet, and by full of people, I mean they serve 100,000 customers per week. Every aspect of shopping there feels like a battle, from parking to maneuvering through the store to getting though the oddly-arranged check out area. (Really, a big rectangular room with cashiers against the walls does not have a traffic flow.)

I sucked it up…this was a worthwhile trip to go on. I decided to go mid-week in the morning, to lessen the crowd aspect. I was pleasantly surprised to see only half the huge parking was full. Sure, there were plenty of people and carts inside, but it was manageable – especially when you see the rows and rows of fresh fruits and vegetables of all descriptions (organic included). Please don’t get me started on all the meats, seafood, cheese, and wine. This is a great place if you love food – a shopping paradise. If you want selection – here it is – mounds of it! I didn’t have much of a list prepared so I would be more open to suggestion (which is often dangerous when grocery shopping), so I did a lot of browsing. I came home with a lot of stuff – grass-fed beef, veal rib chops, chicken thighs, pork chops, littleneck clams, parsley, eggplant, broccoli, garlic, lemons, strawberries, an assortment of mushrooms, olives, a couple bottles of wine, and a bag of Georgia-ground cornmeal. There’s probably more that I don’t remember. Forgive me for listing all of that, but I did it for a reason. It all cost less than $125. I don’t know about you, but I can’t begin to stroll through Whole Foods for that!

I’m a convert – I just have to remember to avoid the place in the afternoon, on weekends, or holidays, and always bring my checkbook (they accept cash, check or ATM only).

Here’s our first meal with the goods from that visit! Thanks, Patty!

Ingredients (All amounts are negotiable – pretty much anything will work!):

Cleaned and ready for the pot!

Before cooking the clams, keep them on ice, outside of a plastic bag (they need to breathe). I put a shallow tray of ice in the sink and left the clams on top of that until I was ready to cook. Just before cooking, scrub the shells with a brush under cold, running water.

Nothing can help you now, my little pretties.

In a large saute pan, melt the butter over medium high heat. Add the garlic and shallot cook until fragrant, without browning (1-2 minutes). Sprinkle in desired amount of crushed pepper flakes and add wine. Bring to a boil and add the clams and oregano. Cover and simmer for 5-8 minutes until clams have opened up, shaking the pan occasionally.

As the clams open, carefully take them out and set aside in a bowl. Discard any clams that have not opened after about 8 minutes.

Continue to simmer the broth until it has reduced some in volume (how much broth you would like with your clams is up to you). Squeeze in the lemon juice and stir in the parsley. Season with a few grindings of black pepper. Taste to see if salt is needed (probably not, because clams are salty!) Add a touch of heavy cream to the broth, if you’d like. Return the clams to the pan to reheat.

We served this with gluten-free cornbread. It would also be great over some gluten-free pasta. Enjoy!

An international shopping experience deserves some international music, don’t you think? First up is a concept that I truly love, Songs Around The World. Musicians from all around the planet collaborating, just remarkable. South Africa, Ireland, New Orleans…but all with a song in their hearts.

Next, something for the little ones…after you’ve had the clams! Dreamland: World Lullabies & Soothing Songs, “quiet time” music from around the world…lull them to sleep and broaden their worldview, all at once!


Clam Linguine With Herb Broth and Clams

Ingredients
3 pounds Manila clams or small littleneck clams
4 tbsp butter
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 small onions, chopped
6 garlic cloves, peeled, smashed
3 medium roma tomatoes, cored, chopped
3 cups dry white wine, such as Pino Grigio
1 cup clam juice
1/3 cup thinly sliced fresh basil leaves
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup chopped fresh oregano, or 2 tbsp dried
2 pinches of dried crushed red pepper
12 ounces linguine

Directions
Place clams in a colander and scrub under running water. Place in a bowl of cold water and set aside for 20 minutes.

Melt butter with olive oil in heavy large pot over medium heat. Add onions and cook until soft, stirring often, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and stir 1 minute. Add tomatoes and cook until beginning to soften, stirring often, about 2 minutes. Add white wine and clam juice and bring to boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer 20 minutes to blend flavors.

Bring broth to boil. Add clams, cover, and cook until clams open, 3 to 5 minutes (discard any clams that do not open). Transfer clams to large bowl tent with foil to keep warm.

Stir basil, parsley, oregano, and crushed red pepper into broth in pot. Add linguine. Boil until pasta is almost tender but still very firm to bite, stirring often and adding clam juice by tablespoonfuls if too dry. Return clams with any accumulated juices to pot. Cover and simmer until clams are heated through and pasta is tender but still firm to bite, about 3 minutes longer. Season to taste with salt and pepper.


Reviews ( 7 )

Many people don't realize that farmed clams don't have as much flavor as wild-harvested ones, so I always plan ahead to use some good quality clam stock or chicken stock to punch up the taste in a clam dish if it needs it. This recipe needs more intensity - double the oregano or add another herb, like thyme or a little basil, and add some chicken or clam broth. More crushed hot red pepper would help. And one of the other reviewers was right - red onion is way too pungent for such a delicate dish. Use sweet onion instead - Vidalia or Texas will work fine. I also add some freshly grated Parmesan to any pasta dish - seafood or not. The method works well - just need more flavor and some zest. Finally, a little swirl of good, unsalted butter always improves a light dish like this one.


Clam Linguine

So, clam linguine. I reckon pretty much everyone has eaten some form of this dish, somewhere. Clams and pasta, in a wine broth. To be honest, there isn’t really much there that can go wrong!!

Clam Linguine has always been one of Danika’s favorite dishes, so it has ended up that I have eaten my fair share. I have had some really good, and some stonkingly bad ones too. One restaurant that I actually really highly regard, but shall remain nameless, did such a bad version of it, we couldn’t eat it. I swear there was two sticks of butter in it. It was completely gross. It also tasted like no alcohol had been burnt off at all. Buttery wine if you will.

Anyhow, enough of the bad.. I originally made up my own clam linguine recipe a year or so ago when I was trying to get the Wrightfood cookbook published (for the latest story on that, feel free to email me). I haven’t cooked it a great deal since then to be honest. Danika was off shellfish when she was pregnant with Drake, and I haven’t actually cooked it since.

So. What makes mine different? Well, this is really very light. The butter is kept to a minimum. I don’t use canned/jar clams to bolster the dish up a bit. Clams come in a shell, not a jar. I also don’t like too much spice in mine. I have eaten a few clam linguine dishes out that have just had waaaaaay too many red pepper flakes in it for my taste. I am sensitive to spice – a little goes a long way for me.

This is really just me playing around with a classic dish, and making it how I like it. The flavors here come from wine, aromatics, herbs, and some great clams. A final sprinkle of red pepper flakes is great, so too is a little parmesan if you are feeling sassy.

And where does one find good clams in Seattle? Drum roll.. Mutual Fish of course! Well duh. You kinda knew I was going to say that. My favorite seafood provider by a country mile. With clams in hand, this dish is really a snap to make – perfect for a quick weeknight, where you want something that tastes like you have been in the kitchen for an hour, but you haven’t.

So, without further ado, here is the recipe.

Clam Linguine

1/2 cup red onion – chopped

2 cloves of garlic – chopped

small handful of fresh thyme leaves – coarsely chopped

small handful of fresh oregano leaves – coarsely chopped

1 decent sized glass of dry white wine

1 small handful of basil and parsley (1 small handful total) – chopped

1/2 cup of either clam juice or chicken stock

Get a large pot of water boiling for the pasta.

Start by cleaning the clams. Run each clam under cold water, and gently scrub with a brush. If the shell is broken, or the clam is open and doesn’t close up when you touch it – lob it out. Repeat for all clams.

Get a large, high sided sauté pan over a medium heat. Add a splash of olive oil, and get it hot. Add the onions, shallots, thyme and oregano. Cook slowly for 5 minutes, until the vegetables have softened. Add the garlic and cook for a further 2 minutes.

Add the linguine to the boiling pasta water, and cook according to package directions.

Crank up the heat to high, and add the glass of white wine. Let this cook down by about half – until the alcohol smell has gone. Gently add the clams, and stir to combine. Put a lid on the pan. Let this cook for a minimum of 3 minutes. We are steaming the clams open in the wine. You might be able to hear the clams opening. After 3 minutes, take the lid off the pan and check out the clams. If 95% of em aren’t open, put the lid back on, and let it cook for another couple of minutes.

When most of the clams are open, add in the butter and stock/clam juice. Gently mix to combine. Add a sprinkling of red pepper flakes, and the parsley and basil.

To serve – divide the pasta between two plates. Top with the clams. Pour the pan broth/juices over both plates. Top with a little grated parmesan if you wish.


Restaurant-Worthy Yet Ridiculously Easy

This recipe is BOTH a quick weeknight meal and something that you might feel like you’d order at a restaurant. That’s a one-two punch, friends. It’s my favorite thing ever.

Tender linguine noodles cook up in a pot of hot broth for a really extra yummy flavor, and then they get tossed with a generous handful of Parmesan, parsley, and shrimp that has been sautéed in a garlic butter sage white wine bath of delicious.

You’re tossing the shrimp with the noodles, herbs, and cheese, and pouring a bit of cream over the whole thing to make it almost resemble an Alfredo, except more delicately light and creamy in a way that lets all of the cheese, herbs, garlic, and white wine shine through in each bite.

You guys. Not to be dramatic or anything but I’m seriously NEEDING this right now all over again.

Here’s what you’re going to do right now. You’re going to put in a grocery order for this recipe, and then post-work, you’re going to get in the kitchen, grab a glass of wine, and smell all the smells while this cooks away. Right? Best idea ever for a Monday?


How to store clams

Clams are highly susceptible to bacterial contamination and growth once they die or get too warm. Therefore, when you buy live clams, it is imperative to keep them cold until you are ready to cook and serve them.

Store live clams in the refrigerator, covered with wet kitchen towels or paper towels. Don&rsquot put them in an airtight container or submerge them in fresh water, as they will die. The key is to keep them truly cold: if possible, at 32°F to 35°F. Within that range, clams should keep in a live state for about four to seven days. Check the clams during that time and look for open shells, which indicate that the clam is dead. Remove any clams with open shells so they do not contaminate the remaining clams.

Shucked clams should be kept in tightly covered containers, immersed in their liquor. They too should keep for up to a week.

You can freeze shucked raw clams in their liquor in airtight containers. Most types of frozen raw or cooked clams will keep for two months if the freezer is set at 0°F or colder. Be sure to thaw frozen clams in the refrigerator, not at room temperature.


313 with tomato herb broth Recipes

Scallops with Tomato-Herb Broth

Scallops with Tomato-Herb Broth

Linguine With Clams in Tomato Herb Sauce

Linguine With Clams in Tomato Herb Sauce

Herb Broth

Herbed Chicken and Mushrooms for the Crock Pot!

Herbed Chicken and Mushrooms for the Crock Pot!

Herb Broth

Greek Tomato Soup (Domatosoupa)

Greek Tomato Soup (Domatosoupa)

Herbed Tomatoes And Green Beans

Herbed Tomatoes And Green Beans

Lamb Stew with Herbes de Provence (Emeril Lagasse)

Lamb Stew with Herbes de Provence (Emeril Lagasse)

Angel Hair in Light Herb Broth

Angel Hair in Light Herb Broth

Herbed Crepes with Ricotta, Green Bell Pepper, and Spring Tomato Sauce

Herbed Crepes with Ricotta, Green Bell Pepper, and Spring Tomato Sauce

Herb Vegetable Broth (Backpacking)

Cook&rsquos Tips on the Best Spaghetti with Clams

To make the best and authentic spaghetti alle vongole just like how it&rsquos served in Italy, here are my cooking tips:

  • Do not overcook the spaghetti pasta. Each strand of the pasta noodle should have a firm bite in the center. The pasta will be added to the sauce so they will be cooked twice. The texture should be al dente when it&rsquos served.
  • Do not overcook the clams. As soon as the clam shells are open, they are cooked. If the clam shells don&rsquot open at the same time, pick them out as soon as they are open. When they are all cooked, return them back into the skillet before adding the pasta.
  • Discard any clams that are not open as they are probably stale or dead, and might have a foul smell.
  • Use a fruity white wine to make the clam sauce. If you can&rsquot take alcohol, you may skip it and use water or chicken broth.


White Wine and Garlic Clam Pasta

Clams are a great seafood ingredient and bring a wonderful salty flavor to a variety of preparations, from rice to pasta to soups. Steamed, grilled, baked, or even served raw, clams are a lean source of protein and are rich in omega-3 fatty acids  . With an outstanding 14.5 grams of protein per 100-gram serving and just 79 calories, clams can be part of a healthy diet and change up your usual dinner menu for something a little more adventurous.

This beautiful dish is great for dinner parties, as it cooks fast and you won't need to mind the stove for longer than 20 minutes. Our clams are steamed in a light broth of fresh tomatoes, onions, garlic, and white wine and served with spaghetti or linguine pasta, so prep all the vegetables ahead, boil the pasta water, and before you know it you'll be serving a flavorful meal.

The ingredients in this dish are few and simple because the clams give it most of its delicious flavor. It's best to use fresh clams if possible to really take advantage of their salty sweetness. The best clams for pasta sauces are littlenecks, Manila, or cockles.