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You Can Only Pay With Your Phone at This Particular Starbucks Store

You Can Only Pay With Your Phone at This Particular Starbucks Store



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Starbucks Headquarters in Seattle is testing a mobile-pay-only store with a pickup window instead of a long line inside

Swap long coffee lines for easy ordering and convenience.

The Starbucks mobile ordering feature launched in September 2015, but since then, customers have noticed that sometimes digital convenience is not nearly as convenient as they thought, and that long lines still awaited them once they went to pick up morning coffee ordered through the Starbucks app.

But now Starbucks is testing out mobile-ordering-only stores at its headquarters in Seattle. Any of the coffee chain’s more than 5,000 employees will be able to simply punch in an order on his or her phone and stop by a “walk-through” window to pick it up at either of the headquarters’ two internal cafes — all without having to wait on any line. If all goes well, this completely digital store design could go national.

“An early experiment, this first of its kind experience will be tailored specifically for convenience, and we expect to learn from this location,” an internal email reads, according to The Seattle Times.

Starbucks is also testing out another feature at its headquarters: the first high-end Reserve store. Starbucks’ Reserve coffee is made in small batches and is brewed using a variety of methods, including cold-brew. The new Starbucks Reserve store will open this fall.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Apple Pay: Starbucks employee confuses it with apple pie

One of the most hotly anticipated events in the mobile space has been Apple's entry into mobile payments. Find out what happens when someone tries to use Apple Pay at Starbucks and Panera Bread.

It's a glorious day at my home in South Carolina, with just a hint of fall coolness to the air, and blue skies with only a few wispy clouds. It is also time for one of the most hotly anticipated technologies of the past few years to finally make its way into the hands of consumers in the form of Apple Pay, the technology giant's first foray into a comprehensive mobile wallet.

If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Apple allows you to enroll standard credit cards from the major banks into its Passbook application, and then pay at participating retailers using Near Field Communications (NFC) short-range radio technology. Apple is not the first company to employ NFC, nor is it the first to bring a digital wallet to mobile devices. Google announced its Google Wallet technology over three years ago, yet failed to capture much interest beyond the initial hoopla. As with all things Apple, prognosticators and pundits have suggested that Apple Pay could completely revolutionize mobile payments, or be yet another flop in the long line of failed mobile payment solutions. After diligently waiting for Apple to release the iOS 8.1 update required to enable Apple Pay, I updated my iPhone 6 and decided to see how all the theory and hype translate into an actual purchase experience.


Watch the video: ΔΟΚΙΜΑΖΟΥΜΕ ΠΕΡΙΣΣΟΤΕΡΑ VIRAL ΚΟΛΠΑ ΚΑΙ ΠΡΟΒΛΕΠΟΥΜΕ ΤΟ ΦΥΛΟ ΤΟΥ ΜΩΡΟΥ ΜΑΣ. THEANO MPOGIATZOGLOU